EPT Warsaw: Feeling ill

Theo Jorgensen is grumbling to his table about a conversation he recently had with a Norwegian. "My Norwegian is so much better than my Swedish," said the Dane in English. "But I couldn't understand a word."

The halls of the European Poker Tour are always abuzz with a multitude of languages, but "English only at the tables" is strictly enorced. So it is that the poker phrase-de-jour, sorry, the poker phrase-of-the-day -- "That is so sick" -- is regularly uttered in numerous accents. There are T-shirts that bear the Scandinavian version -- something like: "That is scho schick" -- and this week we're hearing the Polish translation, which is a good deal more sibilant and is as though a Jungle Book snake is hissing it. "Zsat is sssso sssseeck."

The Team PokerStars Pro Marcin Horecki just uttered those very words in that very accent when he was bluffed out of a small pot by Nabil Bennour, whose nationality remains a mystery at the moment. The board read Jh-2c-9c-3d-4h and Bennour bet 225 on the river into a pot of more than 1,500. "Why so much?" asked Horecki, removing his headphones, smiling and getting general laughs from, among others, the Frenchman Thomas Fougeron.

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Marcin Horecki

It looked for all the world like a value bet, so Horecki folded, even though it was such a tiny amount. Bennour showed A-Q for stone-cold air and that's when we were all reminded of the ssszeeck-ness of it. "Oh. My. God," added Horecki. "I made a pair on the river, man [fours]. But it was impossible. I thought it had to be sixes, sevens, whatever."

The ssszeeck-ness continues into level three.

Howard Swains
@howardswains in European Poker Tour