WSOP 2016: Mojave departs after 'the sickest bustout of my career'

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Felipe 'Mojave' Ramos: Vegas run ends

Felipe Ramos got up from his chair slowly, with an anguished wince, and made his way to the side of the Amazon Room. Poker players only do that when one thing is clear: His World Series of Poker Main Event is over.

"It's probably the sickest bust-out of my whole career," Ramos said, standing still by the exit door, drawing from his water bottle and preparing to face the bustle of the corridor that would lead him back to the hotel and, eventually, out of Las Vegas. That's the end of the summer at the WSOP. A sad moment.

Despite the disappointment, Ramos told the story. They were still in the first orbit of play and one seat was even still vacant. Amir Sahebdivani had not yet shown up. But Steven Uccio, sitting next to the empty seat, had cards and opened to 1,500 from the cutoff.

Ramos, with a stack of 19,300, looked down at kings in the small blind and three-bet to 4,100. Uccio quickly called.

The flop was 2-6-8 rainbow and Ramos bet 3,000. Uccio shoved, covering Ramos with his 60,000+ stack, and Ramos made a quick call. Uccio turned over 10-9 offsuit.

Ramos was ahead at this stage but, as we know, he was the one sent to the rail. The reason? The turn was a 10, the river a seven. It filled Uccio's straight.

"That's probably the best play I've made but the worst bust-out," Ramos said.
"But, whatever. I'm playing much better than I ever used to play, so that means I'm going to keep crushing."

Ramos cashed four times during the World Series this summer, including reaching the final table of the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo tournament. He also became the first Brazilian to play the $50,000 Players Championship, and became a full member of Team PokerStars Pro.

He'll next be with us in Barcelona, when the EPT reconvenes in August. See you there Mojave; this one just wasn't meant to be.

WSOP photos by PokerPhotoArchive.com.